Things you will need to know after today:

  • modern atomic theory
  • structure of the atom
  • information contained in the periodic table
  • how to draw Bohr models of the atom

Resources:

Assignment:

  • Workbook p60-61
  • Worksheet (due next class)
Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.1.notes.atomic.theory.pdf)4.1.notes.atomic.theory.pdf 429 kB

The Bohr model is concerned more with the structure of a single atom rather than how that atom interacts with other atoms to form compounds. Simple compounds can be drawn using Bohr diagrams, but it's the electron configuration that is really important.  There are different ways of drawing Bohr models depending on whether you have an ionic bond (between a metal and a non-metal) or a covalent bond (between 2 non-metals).

Things you should be able to do after today:

  • determine the number of electrons in an ion 
  • draw a Bohr model of an ion
  • draw a Bohr model of an ionic compound
  • draw a Bohr model of a simple covalent compound

Resources:

  • Notes

Assignment:

  • Workbook p60-61
  • Worksheet
Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.2.bohr.diagrams.worksheet.pdf)4.2.bohr.diagrams.worksheet.pdfWorksheet: Bohr Diagrams109 kB
Download this file (4.2.notes.compounds.pdf)4.2.notes.compounds.pdf 505 kB

Bohr Diagrams are great for simple atoms, but once you start looking at how electrons are configured during chemical bonding, the Bohr Diagram starts to become cumbersome and messy.  The Lewis diagram is a variation of the Bohr model that strips out anything that is not important to show chemical bonding. While it has a number of features that are similar, it is a much cleaner way to show interactions of atoms during bonding and emphasizes what happens to the valence electrons  

Another advantage of Lewis diagrams over Bohr diagrams is that it can show what happens when there are more than one bonding pair between two atoms, and is great for explaining why atoms like Oxygen or Nitrogen can form diatomic molecues

Things you should be able to do after today:

  • determine the number of protons and electrons in ions using information from the periodic table
  • draw Lewis diagrams of ions
  • draw Lewis diagrams of ionic compounds
  • draw Lewis diagrams of covalent compounds
  • identify how many lone pairs and bonding pairs are in covalent compounds
  • identify which atoms form diatomic molecules and draw the Lewis Diagrams for them

Resources:

  • Notes

Assignment:

  • Worksheet (we'll go over the answers in class)
  • p62-64 of your workbook

 

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.2c.worksheet.pdf)4.2c.worksheet.pdfLewis Diagrams Worksheet125 kB
Download this file (4.3.notes.lewis.pdf)4.3.notes.lewis.pdfNotes on Lewis Diagrams424 kB

Resources

  • workbook p65-67
  • Notes

Assignment

  • workbook p68-70

Things you should be able to do after today:

  • write the name for an ionic compound
  • write the name for an ionic compound where the metal is multivalent
  • write the name for an ionic compound that includes a polyatomic ion
  • write the formula for an ionic compound if given the name
  • write the formula for an ionic compound that includes a polyatomic ion

Self Assessment:

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.4.notes.pdf)4.4a.notes.pdf 685 kB

There are different rules for naming covalent vs ionic compounds.  One of the reasons is that molecules of ionic compounds interact differently from covalent compounds, and often can interact with each other in addition to how the ions interact within the molecule.  The interactions can be quite complex and you will learn more about them if you take higher level chemistry courses.

If we are only naming the compounds, however, the naming process is quite basic.

Resources

  • Notes

Things you should know after today:

  • how to give the name of a covalent compound using the chemical formula
  • write the chemical formula if you know the covalent compound's name

Assignment

  • Workbook p71-72
Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.4b.notes.pdf)4.4b.notes.pdf 168 kB

The Law of Conservation of Mass states that matter can not be created nor destroyed, and this is a fundamental rule that governs how products can form from reactants in a chemical equation.  Today we will be writing some chemical equations and balancing the products and reactants to ensure that the Law of Conservation of Mass has been applied.

Resources:

  • Textbook p202-211
  • Workbook p74-76
  • Notes

Assignment:

  • Workbook p77-79 (answer key is attached so you can check your answers)
  • Do the worksheet after you have finished the practice.  Have Mr. Yang check your answers with you 
  • When you feel you are ready, take the "Balancing Equations" quiz

Things you should know after today:

  • vocabulary: chemical reaction, reactants, products, word equation, skeleton equation, balanced equation
  • create a skeleton equation from a word equatoin
  • create a balanced equation from a skeleton equation by adding coefficients

Extra Practice:

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.5.workbook.key.pdf)4.5.workbook.key.pdf 665 kB
Download this file (4.5b.notes.pdf)4.5b.notes.pdf 238 kB

Answers to the review questions are attached below

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.8.review.key.pdf)4.8.review.key.pdf 466 kB

Have you finished your assignments?  Check your answers here to check your progress

Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (4.4.workbook.key.pdf)4.4.workbook.key.pdf 563 kB
   
© ALLROUNDER